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Current Issue Highlights

 

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May/June 2017

Next issue, we kick off the summer with a blockbuster techno-thriller from Howard V. Hendrix: One enterprising FBI agent discovers that the Singularity may not only work in one direction, but will that information cost her life? Find out in “The Girl With Kaleidoscope Eyes.” 

Then our fact article comes from Michael Carroll: in our search for alien intelligence, it’s entirely possible (if not likely) that the only civilizations we’ll find will be long dead ones. If that’s the case, then we may need a specialized field to study them; perhaps something like “Alien Archeology.” 

And the short fiction is as varied and unexpected as always: a very real disease begins cropping up in troubling ways, in Stanley Schmidt’s “The Final Nail”; harsh environments sometimes make for harsh interpersonal relationships, but will we carry our old prejudices with us? “Kepler’s Law” from Jay Werkheiser suggests one scenario. Then the famous parable turns out to be both figuratively and literally true, in Julie Novakova’s “To See the Elephant.” 

We round out the issue with a host of shorter pieces, from authors such as Sam Schreiber, Dave Creek, Eric Choi, Bill Pronzini & Barry Malzberg, Igor Teper, Andrew Barton, Bond Elam, Lavie Tidhar, Joe Pitkin, Ken Brady, Gord Sellar, Manny Frishberg & Edd Vick, Dominica Phetteplace, Marissa Lingen, and Bud Sparhawk, as well as all our regular and rock solid columns.

Get your copy now!

 

Novella

The Girls with Kaleidoscope Eyes

by Howard V. Hendrix

The school buses had just started unloading by the time Agent Onilongo arrived and pulled into a Visitor space. Fingering the Möbius softclock pendant on the necklace Philip Marston had given her, she watched as the girls of the Special Class walked toward their temporary replacement classroom.  READ MORE

Novelettes

Kepler's Law

by Jay Werkheiser

The heat shield separated from the shuttle and dropped clear. Gayle nosed down hard and switched the scramjets on. Her stomach dropped, giving her one last taste of the exhilarating feeling of freefall, and the gray horizon rose around her. The scramjets, now free of the heat shielding, began to thrust against the shuttle’s descent.

“Are you trying to kill us?” Anju said from behind her. READ MORE

Poetry

Strangers

by Allina Nunley

He met her in a rugged landscape
so unlike the one he’d grown up in.
For all its variety, his home was a place of reliable patterns...

READ MORE

Departments

Guest Editorial: Science Fiction and the Virtue of Simplicity 

by Richard A. Lovett

I grew up on live theater; my mother was a drama teacher and playwright, and I myself earned my thespian points in high school. So when a troupe called The Pulp Stage invited me to an evening of “bite-sized” plays, I was intrigued.

The Pulp Stage is a Portland, Oregon, theater company whose mission is to find ways of making theater that appeals to people accustomed to movies, TV, and computer games. READ MORE

 
 

The Alternate View: Our Leaking Universe

by John G. Cramer

Modern cosmology is not without its problems. One such problem is that the Hubble constant (symbol H0) has a lower value when extracted from cosmic microwave background data than when extracted from the red-shift recession velocities of “standard candle” stars and galaxies. Another problem is that the value of the cosmological constant (symbol L) as calculated from quantum field theory, has a ridiculously large value as compared to the value extracted from cosmic microwave background data.  READ MORE

 
 

The Reference Library

by Don Sakers

One of the most popular types of science fiction nowadays is the post-apocalyptic story. These are tales set in a future following the collapse of our civilization. As a rule, this protest is over and done with when the story begins; in most cases, it happened in a past beyond living memory. READ MORE

 
 

Upcoming Events

by Anthony Lewis

Check here for the latest conventions upcoming in May and June 2017! READ MORE

 

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