Authors In This Issue

Fiction & Fact:

James C. Glass is a retired physics and astronomy professor and dean who now spends his time writing, painting, traveling, and playing didgeridoo or native American flute. He made his first story sale in 1988 and was the Grand Prize Winner of Writers of the Future in 1991. Since then he has sold nine novels, four short story collections, and over fifty short stories to magazines such as Aboriginal S.F., Analog, and  Talebones. A novel Sedona Conspiracy and a new double anthology came out from Wildside Press in 2011.  Branegate came out in September of 2012 from Fairwood Press, and Eagle Squad in May of 2013.  For details, see his web site at www.sff.net/people/jglass/. He now divides his time between Spokane, Washington and Desert Hot Springs, California with wife Gail, who is a costumer and healing dancer.

Besides selling thirty-five short stories, a dozen poems, and a few comics, Marie Vibbert has been a medieval (SCA) squire, ridden 17% of the roller coasters in the United States and has played O-line and D-line for the Cleveland Fusion women’s tackle football team.

C. Stuart Hardwick is a Writers of the Future winner and three-time Jim Baen Award finalist who’s been published in Analog, Galaxy’s Edge, Forbes.com and Mental Floss, among others. A southerner from South Dakota, Stuart grew up creating radio dramas and animated shorts before moving on to robots and ill-conceived flying machines. He’s worked with the creators of the video game Doom, married an aquanaut, and trained his dog to pull a sled. Stuart studied writing at U.C. Berkeley, lives in Houston, and has been known to wear a cape. For more information and a free signed e-sampler, visit www.cStuartHardwick.com.

Matthew Kressel is a software developer whose short fiction has been nominated for the Nebula Award and the Eugie Award and has appeared in Clarkesworld, Lightspeed, Nightmare, Tor.com, Interzone, Beneath Ceaseless Skies, The Year's Best Science Fiction and Fantasy 2018 Edition, edited by Rich Horton, and The Best Science Fiction of the Year: Volume Three, edited by Neil Clarke, and many other publications. Find him online at www.matthewkressel.net or @mattkressel.

Mercurio D. Rivera is an attorney whose short fiction has been nominated for the World Fantasy Award and has appeared in venues such as Asimov's, Lightspeed, Interzone, Nature, Black Static, Abyss & Apex, Space and Time, Year’s Best SF 34, edited by Gardner Dozois, and elsewhere.  Tor.com called his collection, Across the Event Horizon (NewCon Press), “weird and wonderful,” with “dizzying switchbacks.”  Find him online at mercuriorivera.com.

Tom Greene is a biracial Anglo/Latino science nerd originally from south Texas who currently works as a full time English professor at a small college in the northeast. He lives in a Victorian-era house in Salem, MA with his wife and two cats. Visit his website at www.advancedhypothetics.com.

Sarina Dorie has sold over 150 short stories to markets like Analog, Daily Science Fiction, Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, Orson Scott Card’s IGMS, Cosmos, and Abyss and Apex. Her stories and published novels have won humor contests and Romance Writer of America awards. She has sold three novels to publishers. Her steampunk romance series, The Memory Thief and her collections, Fairies, Robots and Unicorns—Oh My! and Ghosts, Werewolves and Zombies—Oh My! are available on Amazon, along with a dozen other novels she has written. Recently she has released a series titled Womby’s School for Wayward Witches.

A few of her favorite things include: gluten-free brownies (not necessarily glutton-free), Star Trek, steampunk aesthetics, fairies, Severus Snape, Captain Jack Sparrow, and Mr. Darcy.

By day, Sarina is a public school art teacher, artist, belly dance performer and instructor, copy editor, fashion designer, event organizer and probably a few other things. By night, she writes. As you might imagine, this leaves little time for sleep. You can find info about her short stories and novels on her website: www.sarinadorie.com.

Tim McDaniel teaches English as a Second Language at Green River College, not far from Seattle. His short stories, mostly comedic, have appeared in a number of SF/F magazines, including F&SF and Asimov's. He lives with his wife, dog, and cat, and his collection of plastic dinosaurs is the envy of all who encounter it. His author page at Amazon.com is https://www.amazon.com/author/tim-mcdaniel.

Brad Preslar writes from Cincinnati, Ohio, where he lives with his wife Ellie, their son Sam, and their dog Stella. Their dog was named for Ellie’s favorite cider with a nod to Mr. Williams. Sam was named after his grandfathers because he’s too young to have an alcohol-related name. Brad’s fiction has appeared in AE and The Arcanist and is forthcoming in On Spec and Ares Magazine. Find him on Twitter @bradpreslar and on the web at readbradpreslar.com.

Jo Miles is building a more hopeful future, both in her fiction and through her day job, where she helps nonprofits use the internet to save the world. Her most recent stories appear in Diabolical Plots, Agents and Spies, and Galileo's Theme Park. You can find her online at www.jomiles.com and on Twitter as @josmiles. She lives in Maryland, where she is owned by two cats.

Leah Cypess <www.leahcypess.com> is the author of four young adult fantasy novels, starting with Mistwood, and of numerous short stories. She currently lives in Silver Spring, Maryland, with her family.

Bond Elam began reading and writing science fiction in junior high school. While he enjoys reading everything from mysteries to humor to mainstream fiction, he still favors stories in which real science plays a key role. Since graduating from the University of Cincinnati with a B.A. in English, he's lived in eight different cities, including New York, Atlanta and Denver. He's also worked at any number of different jobs, from public health, to trucking, to software development. Along the way he’s taught programming and basic computer skills to everyone from Spanish-speaking immigrants to grad students at the university level. Over the years, his writing has increasingly focuses on two areas: 1) the nature of consciousness, which he believes is far less mysterious than some people want to make it, and 2) the underlying nature of reality, which he believes is far more mysterious than most people want to believe. For the time being, at least, he lives and writes in Cincinnati, though his heart remains atop Huayna Picchu, which he climbed shortly before selling his first story to Analog in 2008.

Vajra Chandrasekera is from Colombo, Sri Lanka. His fiction has appeared in Clarkesworld, Lightspeed, and Strange Horizons, among others. He blogs occasionally at http://vajra.me, and is @_vajra on Twitter.

James Van Pelt is a part-time high school English teacher and full-time writer in western Colorado. He’s been a finalist for a Nebula Award and been reprinted in many year’s best collections.  His first Young Adult novel, Pandora’s Gun, was released from Fairwood Press in August of 2015.  James blogs at http://www.jamesvanpelt.com, and he can be found on Facebook.

Eric Del Carlo’s short fiction has appeared in Asimov’s and Strange Horizons, and previously in Analog. He has written with the late Robert Asprin, and coauthored with his father Victor Del Carlo the novel The Golden Gate Is Empty. His latest book, The Vampire Years, is due out through Elder Signs Press.

Jack McDevitt is the author of twenty-three novels, twelve of which have been Nebula finalists. Seeker won the award in 2006. He has also won the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, and the Robert A. Heinlein lifetime Award. The International Astronomical Union has put his name on an asteroid. His current book is an Academy novel, The Long Sunset. An Alex Benedict novel, Octavia Gone, will be released in May. McDevitt has been an English teacher, a naval officer, a customs officer, and a Philadelphia taxi driver. He is married to the former Maureen McAdams, and resides in Brunswick, Georgia.

When not trying to grown oyster mushrooms under her sink, M.K. Hutchins writes stories, homeschools four kids, and plays board games. She's the author of Drift and The Redwood Palace (forthcoming 2019), as well as numerous short stories appearing in IGMS, Diabolical Plots, and Strange Horizons. Find her at www.mkhutchins.com.

Bud Sparhawk has been a frequent contributor to this magazine since 1992 and has had stories accepted by three successive Analog editors. He has put out several collections of his published works in ebook and print formats.  A complete bibliography can be found at: http://budsparhawk.com. He also writes a weekly blog on the pain of writing at http://budsparhawk.blogspot.com.

Elisabeth R. Adams is a professional astronomer by day/night, and lives in MA with her husband, two cats, and a toddler. More of her writing can be found at her website: http://improbable.org/era.

Brendan DuBois is the award-winning author of more than twenty novels and over 160 short stories. His latest science fiction novel, Black Triumph, will be published later this year by Baen Books. He’s currently working on a series of works with NYT bestselling novelist James Patterson. He is also a “Jeopardy!” game show champion. Visit his website at www.BrendanDuBois.com.

Jay Werkheiser teaches chemistry and physics to high school students, where he often finds inspiration for stories in classroom discussions. Not surprisingly, his stories often deal with alien biochemistry, weird physics, and their effects on the people who interact with them. You can follow him on twitter @JayWerkheiser or read his (much neglected) blog at http://jaywerkheiser.blogspot.com/.

James Gunn, emeritus professor of English at the University of Kansas, has enjoyed careers in both writing and teaching science fiction. Former president of both SFWA and SFRA, he has received the top awards of both associations. His latest novel is Transgalactic. He taught his first science fiction class in 1969.

Andrew P. Dillon graduated in the University of Tennessee’s inaugural MFA class. His work is forthcoming or has appeared most recently in Stirring: A Literary CollectionConnotation PressRivet: The Journal of Writing That Risks, and Public Pool. He lives in Nashville, and is completing his first collection, currently titled Captain for Dark Mornings (after a track on his favorite Laura Nyro album). He is tragically committed to the Buffalo Bills, Buffalo Sabres, and Tennessee Vols. He strongly supports the use of semi-colons, em dashes, and the serial comma.

Columns:

Richard A. Lovett is one of the most prolific contributors in Analog history. He’s also a journalist with close to 3,500 articles to his credit. Many are science, but he’s worn many other hats. “One of the joys of journalism,” he says, “is that it’s perfect for people who can’t decide what they want to do when they grow up.” He has two Analog-related books. Phantom Sense and Other Stories is a fiction collection written with fellow Analog mainstay Mark Niemann-Ross. Here Be There Dragons: Exploring the Fringes of Human Knowledge, contains eighteen of his more popular Analog fact articles. Find him on Facebook or at www.richardalovett.com.

Stanley Schmidt (PhD, Physics) was the Editor of Analog for a long time (34 years!) and enjoys writing for it just as much now as he did before he became Editor in 1978. Most recently he contributed the serialized novel Night Ride and Sunrise and an article on story endings. A small selection of Dr. Schmidt’s many accolades and accomplishments include the Hugo Award for Best Editor: Short Form, the SFWA Solstice Award, and the Robert A. Heinlein Award given for outstanding published works in science fiction and technical writings that inspire the human exploration of space. When not reading Analog just for fun, Dr. Schmidt can be found hiking, traveling, and playing various sorts of music. Find more information about Stanley Schmidt on his website: https://sfwa.org/members/stanleyschmidt.

Don Sakers is the author of Meat and Machine, Elevenses, and the Rule of Five serial at rule-of-5.com. For more information, visit www.scatteredworlds.com.

John G. Cramer’s new book describing his transactional interpretation of quantum mechanics, The Quantum Handshake—Entanglement, Nonlocality, and Transactions, (Springer, January 2016) is available online as a printed or eBook at: http://www.springer.com/gp/ book/9783319246406. His hard SF novels, Twistor and Einstein’s Bridge, are available as eBooks from the Book View Café co-op at: http://bookviewcafe.com/bookstore/?s=Cramer and electronic reprints of over 178 “The Alternate View” columns are available online at: http://www.npl.washington.edu/av.

Robert Scherrer is a cosmologist at Vanderbilt University.  He has a blog on science and science fiction (as well as any other random thoughts that occur to him) at www.cosmicyarns.com.

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