SF Digital Editions

home
Subscribe
E-Analog
Address Change Form
Contact Us
About Analog
Reference Library
Upcoming Events
Links
Story Index
FAQs
Submissions


Digital Issues Amazon Sony ReaderStore Barnes & Noble Google Play Magzter iPad

Vinylz ad


Analog and Asimov's collections are now available at
AUDIBLE.COM

Key Word Search: Analog Science Fiction


Order Your Analog Subscription


 


 

 

Our October 2014 issue

Order your subscription today!

Order Your Subscription Today!

We’re not ones to miss an opportunity for some seasonal stories, so our October issue has a host of fitting fiction, both light-hearted and more sinister.

First up, we’re proud to present something that hasn’t graced the pages of Analog for far too long: new fiction by Joyce and Stanley Schmidt. Not everybody really “gets” Halloween, but when “Opportunity Knocks,” you just have to answer.

Then an installment of Edward M. Lerner’s popular “science behind the stories” series serves as our fact article, this time about one of the Big Questions of SF: “Alien AWOLs: The Great Silence.”

We’ll also have a particularly white-knuckle Mike Christopher story from Dave Creek, “The Jenregar and the Light.”

And there’s a bunch more great content where that came from, like David Brin’s unsettling piece of biological SF, “Chrysalis”; Tony Ballantyne’s story of limits reached, “Threshold”; an unusual adventure from Andrew Barton in “Each Night I Dream of Liberty”; a close look at the ways biology and society intertwine in Mary E. Lowd’s “The Hand-Havers”; and the Nietzche quote about gazing into the abyss exemplified in Ron Collins’ “Unfolding the Multi-Cloud.”

As well as, of course, all our usual top-notch columns.


Congratulations to our Hugo Award Nominees!

The Chaplain's Legacy by Brad Torgersen for Best Novella
The Exchange Officers by Brad Torgersen for Best Novelette

ANALOG IS UP IN SPACE!
Chosen for the library on the International Space Station.

Get Your Subscription Today!


NOTICE TO CONTRIBUTORS
Analog accepts---and prefers---submissions in electronic form. Electronic submissions will be accepted through http://analog.magazinesubmissions.com, where full instructions can be found. Please note that while we welcome electronic submissions, they must be made through the designated website, and not as attachments to regular e-mail.
If you have a print copy of your story currently under consideration, please do not resubmit the story electronically. I will respond to those stories via the traditional SASE.

Trevor Quachri, Editor

Nano-Suit Up!
R.J. Carey

Welcome to New York City, 2047—a landscape of decaying urban structures within a tropical rainforest. Sound like a fun place to stalk and kill vicious genocidal aliens or an evil corporation’s combat units? Then you’re in luck! In Crysis 3, you traverse this environment, called “The Liberty Dome,” as Laurence Barnes, the wearer of a high-tech nanosuit whose call sign is Prophet.
Review of Crysis 3
Interview with Crysis 3 writer, Steven Hall


Opportunity Knocks
By Joyce & Stanley Schmidt

Great spangled fritillaries!”

Strong language for an entomologist, and unlikely language for anybody else. Maybelle Terwilliger, peacefully watching the descending dusk from her rocker on the screened porch of her lakeside cabin, was driven to it by a boom so loud it was startling even against the end-of-summer fireworks in the nearby village. She stopped rocking and sat bolt upright in the chair, straining to see anything different among the bright streaks and starbursts above the dark evergreens. Nothing caught her eye, but she still found the sudden noise unexpectedly disturbing.

The fireworks were not her favorite part of staying near Lake George, but she had learned to live with them. They were, after all, only once a week, and only during the summers. Sometimes, when she was in the right mood, she even enjoyed them. But something about this one felt wrong—out of place, as if it were not really part of the show.

And, without making any conscious connection, she found herself thinking of the bizarre alien invasion Earth had suffered—and survived—a few years ago.

Everybody on Earth remembered that, but Maybelle far more than most. She had been one of the small group that first noticed the hordes of snooping alien probes, and eventually helped avert the danger—but not until plenty of damage had been done. Now she remembered the invader Xiphar’s warning, before his death in a hail of Earth-based missiles, that he was considered an extremely dangerous fugitive from his own civilization, and that they might stop at nothing to track him down and destroy him and anything he had contaminated with his radical technology.

Such as Earth.

Could it be, she wondered with a sudden chill, that the unexpected noise marked the arrival of Xiphar’s pursuers, bent on doing just that? So soon?

The possibility went beyond “disturbing.” But she quickly brushed the notion aside as ridiculous. Even if alien cops were combing the galaxy for Xiphar, surely it was too soon for them to have found their way here. Besides, Xiphar’s own arrival hadn’t been anywhere near that conspicuous. Indeed, it had gone completely unnoticed.

Almost as soon as the thought formed, she smelled rain and heard drops splattering on the porch roof, faster and faster, swelling and merging into a steady roar punctuated with thunder and lightning. The lights and booms of the fireworks quickly faded away, leaving only the rain and thunder. The show organizers knew when to quit. . . .

Read more

The Alternate View by John G. Cramer
Inflation And The Swirls Of Gravity

The Reference Library by Don Sakers
Upcoming Events by Anthony Lewis
Every month, Anthony keeps you up to date on what's going on in the world of science fiction

The Science Behind the Story: The View from the Top
by Jerry Oltion


The Science Behind the Story: A Sound Basis of Misunderstanding
by Carl Frederick


The Science Behind the Story: To Climb A Flat Mountain
by G. David Nordley


The Science Behind the Story: Cavernauts
by David Bartell


The Science Behind the Story: InterstellarNet
by Edward M. Lerner

Archive The Science Behind the Story

Analog Story Wins Highest Japanese SF Award

Arthur C. Clarke Obituary

Paul Levinson interviews Stanley Schmidt


NOVELLA
THE JENREGAR AND THE LIGHT, Dave Creek

NOVELETTE
THRESHOLD, Tony Ballantyne

SHORT STORIES
OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS, Joyce & Stanley Schmidt
EACH NIGHT I DREAM OF LIBERTY, Andrew Barton
UNFOLDING THE MULTI-CLOUD, Ron Collins
THE HAND-HAVERS, Mary E. Lowd
CHRYSALIS, David Brin

SCIENCE FACT
ALIEN AWOLS: THE GREAT SILENCE, Edward M. Lerner

POEM
EARLY MAN, David Livingstone Clink

READER’S DEPARTMENTS
GUEST EDITORIAL: LIVING IN INDIGNATION, Richard A. Lovett
THE ALTERNATE VIEW, Jeffery G. Cramer
IN TIMES TO COME
THE REFERENCE LIBRARY, Don Sakers
BRASS TACKS
UPCOMING EVENTS,
Anthony Lewis



Astounding Science Fiction

Collector's Cards! 

Click here to get yours!



 
 
 

 
Links
ANALOG links

FAQ
If we didn't cover it anywhere else, then look here.

Pictures from the Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame