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Our September 2014 issue

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We kick off this month’s issue with Mark Niemann-Ross’s “Plastic Thingy,” wherein an Average Joe gets a rare opportunity to apply some useful skills to help out his other-than-average new friends.

Then we have “Championship B’tok,” where a game could have very real consequences (and may illuminate more of the secrets of Edward M. Lerner’s InterstellarNet universe).

Our fact article is “Saturn’s ‘Jet-Propelled’ Moon and the Search for Artificial Life,” from Richard A. Lovett; James C. Glass fictionalizes some of that very research and wonders what lies “Beneath the Ice of Enceladus.” We also have a white-knuckled account of interplanetary combat in Jacob A. Boyd’s “Release”; the hurdles of diplomatically dealing with angry aliens in “Calm” from Marissa Lingen and Alec Austin; a look at how AI might influence our end-of-life decisions in Lavie Tidhar’s “Vladimir Chong Chooses to Die”; and Naomi Kritzer explains (to paraphrase the Rolling Stones) that we can’t always get what we want, but sometimes we get what we need, in “Artifice.”


Congratulations to our Hugo Award Nominees!

The Chaplain's Legacy by Brad Torgersen for Best Novella
The Exchange Officers by Brad Torgersen for Best Novelette

ANALOG IS UP IN SPACE!
Chosen for the library on the International Space Station.

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NOTICE TO CONTRIBUTORS
Analog accepts---and prefers---submissions in electronic form. Electronic submissions will be accepted through http://analog.magazinesubmissions.com, where full instructions can be found. Please note that while we welcome electronic submissions, they must be made through the designated website, and not as attachments to regular e-mail.
If you have a print copy of your story currently under consideration, please do not resubmit the story electronically. I will respond to those stories via the traditional SASE.

Trevor Quachri, Editor

Nano-Suit Up!
R.J. Carey

Welcome to New York City, 2047—a landscape of decaying urban structures within a tropical rainforest. Sound like a fun place to stalk and kill vicious genocidal aliens or an evil corporation’s combat units? Then you’re in luck! In Crysis 3, you traverse this environment, called “The Liberty Dome,” as Laurence Barnes, the wearer of a high-tech nanosuit whose call sign is Prophet.
Review of Crysis 3
Interview with Crysis 3 writer, Steven Hall


Plastic Thingy
By Mark Niemann-Ross

Her noisy appearance at the front counter of Hankins Hardware is only made louder by the smell of chlorine. Doing her part to keep Portland weird, I think, as I put down the broom. She’s wearing a funny sort of jacket, stretch pants, and steel-toed boots. Maybe that’s odd, but what’s really unique is her just standing by the counter.

Regular customers of Hankins Hardware know the store layout. They walk in, briefly acknowledge our presence, then disappear down the appropriate row. You want paint? Look in aisle one. Bolts? Located across the front of the store. Aisle five has been electrical for the past two centuries.

Newbies like her walk in and execute a “Deer in the Headlights” maneuver, freezing and scanning the store. Sometimes they carry a handful of broken parts or a plastic bag of moist pipes. Not wanting to admit they’re confused, they take a right turn and head toward the paint aisle. If we’re quick, we can intercept and point them in the right direction. If not, we wait until they loop around and reappear at the front of the gardening aisle.

But not this girl. No handful of parts. No wandering to the paint aisle. She just stands there, expecting us to get her a plastic thingy. It’s near closing time, I should give her the end-of-day brush off.

Every employee at Hankins has seen the obnoxiously cheery training video, but it’s unnecessary. We like working here. We like the challenge of a customer puzzle. In my three years at Hankins, I’ve diagnosed the remains of hundreds of do-it-yourself projects. I can usually send customers home with enough fittings and washers to have a fighting chance at reassembly, possibly even improved functionality. Nothing’s more uplifting than a weekend-warrior returning to the store with parts they didn’t need and a story about the broken whatsit that now works perfectly, closing the narrative with you-guys-are-the-greatest-and-I’ll-be-back as they merrily head out the door into their sunnier future. I’ve got time to help her. That’s one problem with my life—I’ve got plenty of time.

“I can help,” I say. “What are you working on?”

Read more

The Alternate View by John D. Kooistra
Myers-Briggs and I (and You)

The Reference Library by Don Sakers
Upcoming Events by Anthony Lewis
Every month, Anthony keeps you up to date on what's going on in the world of science fiction

The Science Behind the Story: The View from the Top
by Jerry Oltion


The Science Behind the Story: A Sound Basis of Misunderstanding
by Carl Frederick


The Science Behind the Story: To Climb A Flat Mountain
by G. David Nordley


The Science Behind the Story: Cavernauts
by David Bartell


The Science Behind the Story: InterstellarNet
by Edward M. Lerner

Archive The Science Behind the Story

Analog Story Wins Highest Japanese SF Award

Arthur C. Clarke Obituary

Paul Levinson interviews Stanley Schmidt


NOVELLA
CHAMPIONSHIP B’TOK, Edward M. Lerner

NOVELETTES
PLASTIC THINGY, Mark Niemann-Ross
BENEATH THE ICE OF ENCELADUS, James C. Glass

SHORT STORIES
RELEASE, Jacob A. Boyd
VLADIMIR CHONG CHOOSES TO DIE, Lavie Tidhar
ARTIFICE, Naomi Kritzer
CALM, Alec Austin & Marissa Lingen

SCIENCE FACT
SATURN’S “JET-PROPELLED” MOON AND THE SEARCH FOR EXTRATERRESTRIAL LIFE, Richard A. Lovett

POEM
HAIKU, Kate Gladstone

READER’S DEPARTMENTS
THE EDITOR’S PAGE. Trevor Quachri
THE ALTERNATE VIEW, Jeffery D. Kooistra
IN TIMES TO COME
THE REFERENCE LIBRARY, Don Sakers
BRASS TACKS
UPCOMING EVENTS,
Anthony Lewis



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