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Our January/February 2014 issue

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In our January/February issue, we put the double-issue format to good use, with a long novella from Richard A. Lovett for our lead story. “Music to Me” looks in on beloved AI Brittney and asks to what lengths one might go to make amends with a friend.

We also have the second part of Karl Schroeder’s Lockstep: Toby and his companions have some distinctly unfriendly people on their trail, and if they have any hope of surviving, Toby is going to have to adjust to his fantastic new surroundings, fast.

Then Kyle Kirkland brings us “Lighting up the Brain: The Use of Electromagnetic Radiation to Stimulate Neurons.” Aside from being a regular Analog contributor, Kyle has a doctorate in neuroscience, and if he’s right about even half of what he talks about here, you might just wish this was one of his fiction pieces.

There are plenty of shorter stories, too, of course, like Carl Frederick’s “Mouseunderstanding”; Marie Des Jardin’s “The Problem with Reproducible Bugs”; Rob Chilson’s “The Tansy Tree”; Grey Rollins’ return to the pages of Analog, with “Determined Spirits”; and many more.


2013 Reader's Award Ballot
Click here to vote. All entries must be received by February 1, 2014


ANALOG IS UP IN SPACE!
Chosen for the library on the International Space Station.

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NOTICE TO CONTRIBUTORS
Analog accepts---and prefers---submissions in electronic form. Electronic submissions will be accepted through http://analog.magazinesubmissions.com, where full instructions can be found. Please note that while we welcome electronic submissions, they must be made through the designated website, and not as attachments to regular e-mail.
If you have a print copy of your story currently under consideration, please do not resubmit the story electronically. I will respond to those stories via the traditional SASE.

Trevor Quachri, Editor

Nano-Suit Up!
R.J. Carey

Welcome to New York City, 2047—a landscape of decaying urban structures within a tropical rainforest. Sound like a fun place to stalk and kill vicious genocidal aliens or an evil corporation’s combat units? Then you’re in luck! In Crysis 3, you traverse this environment, called “The Liberty Dome,” as Laurence Barnes, the wearer of a high-tech nanosuit whose call sign is Prophet.
Review of Crysis 3
Interview with Crysis 3 writer, Steven Hall


Music to Me
By Richard A. Lovett

Saturn was a striped ball close above the skimmer’s nose. It seemed like forever since I’d last seen it, though I suppose as humans count such things, it wasn’t that long. It’s just that my life goes by more slowly. Especially now that I really was BrittneyShip, without Floyd to think about. Or at least not Floyd, present tense. Floyd, past tense, was something I’d always think about unless someday I decide to erase the memories forever.

I could do that, or put them in remote storage where, if need be, I could have them back. I could even pick and choose. Keep the good stuff, such as exploring the alien spacewreck on Triton. Offload the bad stuff, such as wondering how things would have been different had I not been so stupid at the dance. But I’ll never do it. Despite all the psych-babble about the healing power of letting go, experience is what makes you who you are. Who would I be if I tried to pick and choose?

Even Saturn had its mix of memories. At one level, this was my first home—the place where the me who I really am was born. But those first true memories are the worst of all: the terrible emptiness of no data. If there’s a hell, that’s what it would be. Nothing, nothing, nothing, forever—with nothing but awareness to go with it. Forget Dante and his demon whips, boiling blood, bodies frozen in ice. No data, forever . . . that has to be the ultimate horror. . . .

Read more

The Alternate View by Jeffery D. Kooistra
On Investigating Heretical Gizmos

The Reference Library by Don Sakers
Upcoming Events by Anthony Lewis
Every month, Anthony keeps you up to date on what's going on in the world of science fiction

The Science Behind the Story: The View from the Top
by Jerry Oltion


The Science Behind the Story: A Sound Basis of Misunderstanding
by Carl Frederick


The Science Behind the Story: To Climb A Flat Mountain
by G. David Nordley


The Science Behind the Story: Cavernauts
by David Bartell


The Science Behind the Story: InterstellarNet
by Edward M. Lerner

Archive The Science Behind the Story

Analog Story Wins Highest Japanese SF Award

Arthur C. Clarke Obituary

Paul Levinson interviews Stanley Schmidt


SERIAL
LOCKSTEP, part II of IV, Karl Schroeder

NOVELLAS
MUSIC TO ME, Richard A. Lovett

NOVELETTES
THE TANSY TREE, Rob Chilson
DETERMINED SPIRITS, Grey Rollins

SHORT STORIES
MOUSUNDERSTANDING, Carl Frederick
WINE, WOMEN, AND STARS, Thoraiya Dyer
THIS IS AS I WISH TO BE RESTORED, Christie Yant
THE PROBLEM WITH REPRODUCIBLE BUGS, Marie DesJardin
JUST LIKE GRANDMA USED TO MAKE, Brenta Blevins
RACING PREJUDICE, John Frye III
TECHNOLOGICAL PLATEAU, Michael Turton
THIS QUIET DUST, Karl Bunker

SCIENCE FACT
LIGHTING UP THE BRAIN: THE USE OF ELECTROMAGNETIC
RADIATION TO STIMULATE NEURONS,
Kyle Kirkland

POETRY
NOTHING TO FEAR, Kate Gladstone
PRODUCT RECALLS, Mary Turzillo

READER’S DEPARTMENTS
THE EDITOR'S PAGE: CHECKLISTS, Trevor Quachri
IN TIMES TO COME
THE ALTERNATE VIEW, Jeffery D. Kooistra
THE REFERENCE LIBRARY, Don Sakers
BRASS TACKS
THE 2013 INDEX
ANALYTICAL LABORATORY BALLOT
UPCOMING EVENTS, Anthony Lewis



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